Posts by Katie Fortney

 
  • Who “owns” your data?

    Which of these is true? “The PI owns the data.” “The university owns the data.” “Nobody can own it; data isn’t copyrightable.” You’ve probably heard somebody say at least one of these things — confidently. Maybe you’ve heard all of them. Maybe about the same dataset (but in that case, hopefully not from the same person). So who really owns research data? Well, the short answer is “it depends.” A longer answer is that determining ownership (and whether there’s even anything to own) can be frustratingly complicated — and, even when obvious, ownership only determines some of what can be […]

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  • Questions about U.S. federal funder public access policies? We have a page for that.

    In February 2013, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) issued a memo requiring many federal agencies to develop policies ensuring that the research that they fund would be freely publicly available. It took time for the agencies to develop their plans, get them approved by OSTP, and release them to the public, but most of them have done it now. They’re not all easy to find, and once you find them it’s not always easy to to tell whether you’re looking at the most current version, or to understand the basic requirements. To help UC scholars […]

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  • Getting found: Indexing and the independent OA journal

    Running an independent journal is a lot of work, even if you’re just focused on managing the process of moving articles through submission, review, and publication. But publishing an article isn’t the end of the story. Even a great article won’t make an impact unless people read it. And without visibility, even a journal with a terrific editorial board won’t get the kind of submissions it’s looking for. WestJEM – the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine: Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health – gets ten times the submissions that it got a decade ago. In 2008 it averaged about 2,000 […]

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  • Celebrate Fair Use Week 2016

    This week UC Libraries join other organizations around the world in celebrating Fair Use Week, which honors the important doctrines of fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions. It’s a great time to learn about all the ways in which this important exception to the rights of copyright holders enhances our lives both inside and outside the university.

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  • Glossa logo

    UC linguistics faculty pledge support for Glossa, call for cancellation of Lingua

    In November 2015, the editorial board of Lingua, a linguistics journal published by Elsevier, resigned en masse to begin a new open access journal, Glossa. The decision followed a series of disagreements with the publisher which are discussed in this post on Language Log. Several UC linguistics faculty have now issued a statement declaring their support for the new journal and urging their colleagues and the UC libraries to no longer support Lingua. In response, the UC libraries have informed Elsevier that they wish to cancel their subscription to Lingua. “The UC Linguistics faculty statement of support for Glossa reflects […]

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  • A social networking site is not an open access repository

    “What’s the difference between ResearchGate, Academia.edu, and the institutional repository?” “I put my papers in ResearchGate, is that enough for the open access policy? These and similar questions have been been common at open access events over the past couple of years. Authors want to better understand the differences between these platforms and when they should use one, the other, or some combination. First, a brief primer on what each service has to offer:

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  • woman in office full of books

    Newly revised UC Copyright and Fair Use Policy and UC Copyright website better support students and staff

    The University of California has issued a revised systemwide policy on Copyright and Fair Use, replacing the 1986 Policy on the Reproduction of Copyrighted Materials for Teaching and Research and its accompanying guidelines. The revised policy, which became effective July 9, 2015, is a clear statement by the University in support of copyright law, including the principle of fair use. The UC Copyright website, which has more detailed information about copyright and fair use for members of the UC community, has also been revised.

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  • UC Launches Robust Publication Management System in Support of Open Access Policy

    By fall of 2015, all UC Senate faculty will have access to a new publication management system that searches scholarly databases for faculty article records, emails authors when new articles are found, and supports easy deposit of those articles into eScholarship, UC’s open access repository and publishing platform. This “harvesting” system is currently being implemented across the UC campuses in response to the Academic Senate’s call for an efficient mechanism for facilitating faculty participation in the UC Open Access policy. While the initial focus has been on supporting the Open Access Policy, the system also has the ability to connect to […]

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  • Celebrate Fair Use Week 2015

    Members of the UC community rely on the “fair use” provision of US copyright law  every day when sharing articles or images with their students, or when quoting or excerpting others’ works to create their own scholarship. Fair use allows for limited copying of copyrighted works without the permission of the copyright owner. Under certain conditions, copyrighted works may be used for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship or research.  Colleges and universities across the country began celebrating “Fair Use Week” in 2014 in order to explain, celebrate, and promote fair […]

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  • Proposed Presidential Policy on Open Access Would Reach All Non-Senate UC Authors

    Academic Senate faculty are currently the only University of California authors covered by a UC open access policy, but that may soon change. Provost Aimée Dorr recently distributed a draft proposal for a broader open access policy that would cover all other UC employees. Comments on the proposed policy are due by January 15, 2015. The text of the policy and its accompanying documents can be found on the UCOP Academic Affairs website.

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As a leader in the global movement toward open access to publicly funded research, the University of California is taking a firm stand by deciding not to renew its subscriptions with Elsevier.
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