Posts by Catherine Mitchell

 
  • Academy-owned? Academic-led? Community-led? What’s at stake in the words we use to describe new publishing paradigms

    Editor’s note: This blog post is cross-posted from the Library Publishing Coalition (LPC) blog and is LPC’s official contribution to Academic Led Publishing Day (ALPD), a global digital event to foster discussions about how members of the scholarly community can develop and support academic-led publishing initiatives. LPC is participating in ALPD because it presents an opportunity to have a multi-stakeholder discussion about an issue of growing importance to libraries, and to call attention to the lack of a shared vision in this critical area. Our goals in this post are to highlight some of the unresolved questions in this space and to […]

    Share
     
  •  
  • book cover, gold text on blue background, for "The University of California: Creating, Nurturing, and Maintaining Academic Quality in a Public-University Setting"

    Interview with Jud King: an author’s perspective on the rewards and challenges of open access book publishing

    Jud King is Provost and Senior Vice President, Emeritus of UC, as well as former Provost – Professional Schools and Colleges, Dean of the College of Chemistry, Director of the Center for Studies in Higher Education, and Professor Emeritus of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Berkeley. He has recently written a book¹ on the entire University of California, exploring “the structural, policy, operational, and environmental matters that have contributed to [its] success…” Published by the Berkeley campus Center for Studies in Higher Education in January, 2018, the book is both open-access and, essentially, self-published. We asked Jud to reflect on […]

    Share
     
  •  
  • Does the UC Open Access Policy miss the mark? Depends on which mark.

    Institutional open access policies often get a bad rap. Critics point to their lack of “teeth”; their poor compliance rates; their failure, thus far, to effect substantial change within the economically unsustainable and locked down scholarly publishing environment. Motivated by the desire to free all scholarship from publisher access restrictions and the equally ambitious goal of empowering all authors to retain rights to their scholarly publications, these policies struggle mightily under the weight of expectations. But maybe we are expecting too much — or not enough.

    Share
     
  •