Blog Posts

Pathways to Open Access: Choices and Opportunities

A Call to Action

On June 21, the University of California’s Systemwide Library and Scholarly Information Advisory Committee (SLASIAC) issued a Call to Action here on this blog in which they announced their intent to embark on a new phase of activity in journal negotiations focused on open access (OA) to research. The Call to Action appeared alongside discussion of another recently-released University of California document, the Declaration of Rights and Principles to Transform Scholarly Communication, put forth by our system-wide faculty senate library committee (UCOLASC) and intended to guide our libraries toward OA when negotiating with publishers.

There are twin challenges underlying SLASIAC’s Call to Action, and UCOLASC’s Declaration of Rights and Principles: On the one hand, determining how to maintain subscriptions to scholarly journals in a context of escalating subscription costs and shrinking collections budgets, and on the other, pursuing the moral imperative of achieving a truly open scholarly communication system in which the UC’s vast research output is available and accessible to the world. The UC libraries have been working to address these dual needs, and we wish to highlight here some of the efforts our libraries have undertaken in this regard — particularly those in which we are working in concert. (more…)

Open Mic: L2 Journal editors on the rapidly growing field of applied linguistics, the challenges of transhumanism, and the power of open access

Open Mic is a new, informal interview series with editors of open access journals, offering insider perspectives on publishing culture across disciplines and fields.

In this Open Mic interview with UC Berkeley’s L2 Journal of applied linguistics, we spoke with founder, General Editor, and Professor of German Claire Kramsch; Managing Editor and French Department PhD student Emily Linares; and Mark Kaiser, Associate Director of the Berkeley Language Center, which sponsors the journal, and creator of the BLC Library of Foreign Language Film Clips. (The original sponsor of L2 Journal was the UC Consortium for Language Learning & Teaching.)

To start with the basics: what exactly is applied linguistics? How would you describe it to someone with no knowledge of the field? (more…)

Championing Change in Journal Negotiations

Over the past year, the University of California’s Systemwide Library and Scholarly Information Advisory Committee (SLASIAC), in partnership with our university libraries and the systemwide academic senate’s Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication (UCOLASC), has been considering the twin challenges of journal affordability and the moral imperative of achieving a truly open scholarly communication system.  Making the research produced at the University of California open to the world has long been an important goal at UC, as evidenced by the strong Open Access policies enacted at the campus and systemwide level, our many initiatives to create open access publishing options for UC authors (including CDL’s eScholarship publishing service and our early open access pilots with third party publishers), and most recently, a Declaration of Rights and Principles to Transform Scholarly Communication promulgated by UCOLASC.

We believe it is time to take a further step along this road. (more…)

Arnhold-Punctum Publishing Lab at UCSB Library: A Case Study in Library-Publisher Collaboration

I think we are dealing with massive uncertainty in almost every sphere at this point…Effective collaborations are going to be especially important now.

Clifford Lynch, Coalition for Networked Information December 2017 Member Meeting

At the Arnhold-Punctum Publishing Lab at UCSB Library, undergraduate students are doing the work of publishing scholarly monographs. The unusual cohort of academics responsible for the launch and success of this Lab believes that the future of scholarly publishing is a collaborative, community-based, mission-driven, and service-oriented endeavor that engages teams with a range of skills, knowledge, expertise, and resources. But, before I get too far ahead of myself, let me describe the Lab and introduce its various participants.

The Lab and Students

Funded by an Arnhold Research Grant for Undergraduate Education, the seminar-workshop style lab, aimed at undergraduate students interested in creative publishing and scholarly communications, was first offered at UCSB as a two quarter practicum during the Winter-Spring quarters of 2017. The cohort included nine undergraduates, two graduate student coordinators, one faculty coordinator, a publisher, a scholarly communication librarian, a data librarian, and, of course, the authors, or more specifically, their manuscripts. (more…)

Proposed Presidential Policy on Open Access for Theses and Dissertations

A proposed new presidential policy on open access theses and dissertations is open for systemwide review until February 28, 2018. All members of the UC community are invited to comment on the draft policy. Visit the UC Academic Affairs website to read the draft policy, a cover letter with instructions on where to send comments, and a set of Frequently Asked Questions.

The draft policy was written by a task force including graduate students as well as representatives of the Graduate Deans, the Coordinating Committee on Graduate Affairs, the UC Libraries, and others. If passed, the policy will expand the University of California’s commitment to disseminating UC research as widely as possible by building on the Academic Senate and Presidential open access policies already in place. Like its predecessors, this policy on open access theses and dissertations would enable California and the rest of the world to freely access the research of UC scholars and, likewise, would improve the ability of UC’s graduates to reach a global audience.

Many UC dissertations are already freely available to read online; the draft policy would align practices across the UC system by requiring all new UC dissertations and theses to be made open access. The policy does not affect copyright ownership, which remains with graduate student authors absent unusual circumstances. Students who do not want their work to be available immediately can specify an embargo period. (more…)

Reputation managment: your identity, your story

Unless you are a CIA operative or completely off the grid, you are very likely to have some sort of digital footprint beyond your published articles and departmental faculty profile. This can be a good thing if, for example, you are:

  • entering the job market or looking for collaborators in interdisciplinary research;
  • applying for a major research grant;
  • hoping the media will call you for an expert opinion in your field of study;
  • trying to reach the public and/or policy makers who are misunderstanding (and defunding) the research being done in your field.

Having a digital presence beyond your formal academic work can be immensely beneficial. The trick is to take control of that digital presence and ensure that it works to your benefit. Luckily, there is help to be found; publishers, universities, and academic libraries all provide resources to help their academic communities effectively curate a professional, online scholarly identity. (more…)

It’s here! CDL launches redesigned eScholarship

The Publishing group at the California Digital Library is pleased to announce the launch of a major redesign of the eScholarship publishing and repository platform.

The new eScholarship site includes:

  • Enhanced campus repository sites
  • Advanced customization tools for journals and publishing units
  • Expanded readership metrics, including Altmetrics for repository content
  • Mobile friendly, interactive, and accessible experience for readers
  • Open source technology solutions

(more…)

UC campuses celebrate Open Access Week 2017

Poster: "Open in  order to... raise the visibility of my research. Open Access Week 2017. www.openaccessweek.org | October 23-29"

Poster from openaccessweek.org, used under a CC BY 2.0 license

This year, international Open Access Week is October 23-29.. The theme, “Open in Order to…,” was chosen, according to Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC, to highlight the many benefits of open access  for different people, including “increasing citation counts, enabling anyone to learn from the latest scholarship, or accelerating the translation of research into economic gains.”

The University of California Libraries have planned a variety of events this year in order to explore and celebrate issues related to open access. Find one near you! (more…)

A belated update on DMCA takedown notices

Back in 2014, the University of California got its first set of DMCA takedown notices for eScholarship, UC’s open access repository and publishing platform. I wrote about it here on the OSC blog, which you can check out if you want to see our tips for authors who want to avoid receiving a takedown notice (short version: post the right version of your article).

I also said in that post that we’d report on any other notices that UC received for eScholarship, because we believe it’s important to be transparent about which publishers are using this procedure to target article sharing by their own authors. We’ve received two more sets of notices this year, and I haven’t posted about it until now. Mea culpa! (more…)

Redundancy is resistance: share your scholarship

Who has the right to make your scholarship available? Who is able to read it? And who can disappear it?

If you haven’t given these questions much thought to date, it is worth having a fresh look as national conversations about the power of information—and the awful power of misinformation—continue to grow in prominence. It is a bleak testament to the importance of the academic enterprise that the ways in which scholarship is made and accessed are disputed territory in the campaign against facts. (more…)