Post Tagged with: "UC OA Policies"

 
  • Pathways to Open Access: Library Publishing/Repository Services and CDL

    The Pathways blog series highlights CDL’s efforts on various pathways to open access and illustrates how diverse approaches can complement and reinforce each other–and how they can raise productive tensions that push us to think more critically about the work we do. We believe this kind of approach can move us toward true and comprehensive transformation of the scholarly communications landscape. What is the strategy described in this post? This post discusses the California Digital Library’s eScholarship Publishing and Repository Services as core pathways to open access at the University of California. Ellen Finnie’s prior post in this series focused on the […]

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  • Campus Partner Highlight: Mitchell Brown reflects on the success of eScholarship at UC Irvine

    As the celebrations of eScholarship’s 20th anniversary continue, we turn our attention to our longstanding relationship with UC Irvine and our successful partnership on both the repository and journals sides of the program.  UC Irvine boasts ​​10 journals and 59 campus department homepages in eScholarship, showcasing the breadth of research at UCI – in the arts and social sciences, as well as earth, biological, and medical sciences. To date, open access (OA) content on the UCI eScholarship site has received a staggering 13.5 million views: if one of the goals of OA is to reach a wide readership, then UCI […]

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  • University of California Issues Policy on Open Access for Theses and Dissertations

    On March 25, 2020, the University of California issued a Policy on Open Access for Theses and Dissertations. The systemwide policy, which aligns with those already in place at individual UC campuses, “requires theses or dissertations prepared at the University to be (1) deposited into an open access repository, and (2) freely and openly available to the public, subject to a requested delay of access (“embargo”) obtained by the student.” Theses and dissertations already made open access can be read in eScholarship, UC’s open access repository and scholarly publishing platform. With this policy, “the University affirms the long-standing tradition that […]

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  • UC Irvine first campus to launch Presidential OA Policy

    This week, UC Irvine became the first UC campus to launch the UC Presidential Open Access Policy implementation, enabling UC Irvine Health Science Clinical Professors and Librarians to join their Academic Senate colleagues in using the UC Publication Management System to make their scholarly articles freely available in eScholarship, UC’s open access repository and publishing platform.  Thanks to increasingly enthusiastic participation in the Academic Senate OA Policy, the global community (both academic and public) now has access to nearly 46,000 articles that would otherwise be locked behind publisher paywalls. Participation in the Presidential OA Policy builds on this momentum by […]

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  • Comment on proposed UC-wide OA policy for dissertations and theses before April 10

    A second systemwide review window is open for a draft policy on open access to University of California dissertations and theses. The current review period extends to April 10 and all members of the UC community are welcome to submit comments and questions. The draft policy and accompanying documents, including a cover letter and FAQs, are available on the Academic Personnel and Programs website. As explained in the review cover letter, the revised policy provides a clearer and more streamlined process for embargo extensions. The new draft also more closely mirrors most existing UC campus policies on dissertations and theses […]

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  • Proposed Presidential Policy on Open Access for Theses and Dissertations

    A proposed new presidential policy on open access theses and dissertations is open for systemwide review until February 28, 2018. All members of the UC community are invited to comment on the draft policy. Visit the UC Academic Affairs website to read the draft policy, a cover letter with instructions on where to send comments, and a set of Frequently Asked Questions. The draft policy was written by a task force including graduate students as well as representatives of the Graduate Deans, the Coordinating Committee on Graduate Affairs, the UC Libraries, and others. If passed, the policy will expand the […]

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  • Redundancy is resistance: share your scholarship

    Who has the right to make your scholarship available? Who is able to read it? And who can disappear it? If you haven’t given these questions much thought to date, it is worth having a fresh look as national conversations about the power of information—and the awful power of misinformation—continue to grow in prominence. It is a bleak testament to the importance of the academic enterprise that the ways in which scholarship is made and accessed are disputed territory in the campaign against facts.

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  • Statement on Commitment to Free and Open Information, Scholarship, and Knowledge Exchange

    The University of California Office of Scholarly Communication (OSC) and the University of California Libraries issue the following statement in response to recent actions by the new federal administration and in order to address resulting concerns about continued open access to and preservation of information, scholarship, and knowledge. The unfettered exchange and careful preservation of information are fundamental to democracy, progress, and intellectual freedom. The critical research and scholarship conducted by government entities and academic institutions worldwide safeguard and support human rights, public health, the environment, artistic and literary enterprise, scientific and technological innovation, and much more. This scholarship is […]

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  • Does the UC Open Access Policy miss the mark? Depends on which mark.

    Institutional open access policies often get a bad rap. Critics point to their lack of “teeth”; their poor compliance rates; their failure, thus far, to effect substantial change within the economically unsustainable and locked down scholarly publishing environment. Motivated by the desire to free all scholarship from publisher access restrictions and the equally ambitious goal of empowering all authors to retain rights to their scholarly publications, these policies struggle mightily under the weight of expectations. But maybe we are expecting too much — or not enough.

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  • Groundbreaking University of California policy extends free access to all scholarly articles written by UC employees

    Today the University of California expands the reach of its research publications by issuing a Presidential Open Access Policy, allowing future scholarly articles authored by all UC employees to be freely shared with readers worldwide. Building on UC’s previously-adopted Academic Senate open access (OA) policies, this new policy enables the university system and associated national labs to provide unprecedented access to scholarly research authored by clinical faculty, lecturers, staff researchers, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students and librarians – just to name a few. Comprising ten campuses, five medical centers, and nearly 200,000 employees, the UC system is responsible for over 2% […]

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