Post Tagged with: "Copyright"

 
  • A belated update on DMCA takedown notices

    Back in 2014, the University of California got its first set of DMCA takedown notices for eScholarship, UC’s open access repository and publishing platform. I wrote about it here on the OSC blog, which you can check out if you want to see our tips for authors who want to avoid receiving a takedown notice (short version: post the right version of your article). I also said in that post that we’d report on any other notices that UC received for eScholarship, because we believe it’s important to be transparent about which publishers are using this procedure to target article […]

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  • Redundancy is resistance: share your scholarship

    Who has the right to make your scholarship available? Who is able to read it? And who can disappear it? If you haven’t given these questions much thought to date, it is worth having a fresh look as national conversations about the power of information—and the awful power of misinformation—continue to grow in prominence. It is a bleak testament to the importance of the academic enterprise that the ways in which scholarship is made and accessed are disputed territory in the campaign against facts.

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  • guitar made of building blocks

    Rocking out to fair use

    Is using someone else’s copyrighted work always unlawful? Absolutely not. There are many circumstances where reproducing someone else’s copyrighted work is fair – more specifically, “fair use.” Examples of fair use include providing commentary, news reporting, academic research and scholarship, and even search engine interaction with copyrighted content. Academic libraries across the United States and Canada are celebrating Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017 this third full week of February. How will you be taking part in the celebration? We at UCLA Library will be literally rocking out to a fair use performance of video game music as we close out […]

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  • My dissertation is online! Wait – my dissertation is online!? Copyright & your magnum opus

    You’ve worked painstakingly for years (we won’t let on how many) on your magnum opus: your dissertation—the scholarly key to completing your graduate degree, securing a possible first book deal, and making inroads toward faculty status somewhere. Then, as you are about to submit your pièce de résistance through ProQuest’s online administration system, you are confronted with the realization that—for students at many institutions—your dissertation is about to be made available open access online to readers all over the world (hurrah! and gulp). Because your dissertation will be openly available online, there are many questions you need to address—both about […]

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  • CC BY and data: Not always a good fit.

    Last week I wrote about data ownership, and how focusing on “ownership” might drive you nuts without actually answering important questions about what can be done with data. In that context, I mentioned a couple of times that you (or your funder) might want data to be shared under CC0, but I didn’t clarify what CC0 actually means. This week, I’m back to dig into the topic of Creative Commons (CC) licenses and public domain tools — and how they work with data.

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  • Who “owns” your data?

    Which of these is true? “The PI owns the data.” “The university owns the data.” “Nobody can own it; data isn’t copyrightable.” You’ve probably heard somebody say at least one of these things — confidently. Maybe you’ve heard all of them. Maybe about the same dataset (but in that case, hopefully not from the same person). So who really owns research data? Well, the short answer is “it depends.” A longer answer is that determining ownership (and whether there’s even anything to own) can be frustratingly complicated — and, even when obvious, ownership only determines some of what can be […]

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  • Celebrate Fair Use Week 2016

    This week UC Libraries join other organizations around the world in celebrating Fair Use Week, which honors the important doctrines of fair use in the United States and fair dealing in Canada and other jurisdictions. It’s a great time to learn about all the ways in which this important exception to the rights of copyright holders enhances our lives both inside and outside the university.

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  • UC Libraries Statement on Authors Guild v. Google

    The University of California libraries applaud the ruling by the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals that Google’s digitization of library collections, creation of search functionality, display of snippets, and provision of copies to its partner libraries are all non-infringing fair uses. As an outcome of our partnership with Google, close to 4 million volumes digitized from UC library collections are held within the HathiTrust Digital Library, including many works that are in the public domain or long out of print.  The digitization of these collections is a necessary foundation for 21st century scholarship, enabling richer discovery and engagement with […]

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    Newly revised UC Copyright and Fair Use Policy and UC Copyright website better support students and staff

    The University of California has issued a revised systemwide policy on Copyright and Fair Use, replacing the 1986 Policy on the Reproduction of Copyrighted Materials for Teaching and Research and its accompanying guidelines. The revised policy, which became effective July 9, 2015, is a clear statement by the University in support of copyright law, including the principle of fair use. The UC Copyright website, which has more detailed information about copyright and fair use for members of the UC community, has also been revised.

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  • Celebrate Fair Use Week 2015

    Members of the UC community rely on the “fair use” provision of US copyright law  every day when sharing articles or images with their students, or when quoting or excerpting others’ works to create their own scholarship. Fair use allows for limited copying of copyrighted works without the permission of the copyright owner. Under certain conditions, copyrighted works may be used for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship or research.  Colleges and universities across the country began celebrating “Fair Use Week” in 2014 in order to explain, celebrate, and promote fair […]

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