Standards in academic publishing are shifting. Peer reviewed articles and monographs published by commercial and academic presses are still the primary modes scholars use to communicate their research, but they’re certainly not the only ones.

More and more, researchers are taking advantage of new technologies and evolving ideas about impact and audience. They are experimenting with new approaches to collaboration, format, funding, and more. Read about a few recent innovations at UC below, and see more in our OA Innovations @ UC archive.

If you know about other projects we should highlight, send us an email.


Doing it Right: A Better Approach for Software & Data

Researchers at UC and around the world now have access to streamlined workflows for publishing their research data and software – and linking the two – through Dryad and Zenodo.

The Dryad and Zenodo teams are proud to announce the launch of our first formal integration. Researchers submitting data for curation and publication at Dryad will now have the option to upload code, scripts, and software packages on a new tab “Upload Software”. Anything uploaded here will be sent directly to Zenodo. Researchers will also have the opportunity to select the proper license for their software, as opposed to Dryad’s CC0 license.

Those familiar with Dryad may know that Dryad has a feature to keep datasets private during the peer review period, with a double blind download URL that allows for journal offices and collaborators to access the data prior to manuscript acceptance. Zenodo hosted software will be included in this private URL and will be held from the public until the dataset is ready to be published.

Read the rest of the Dryad and Zenodo article.


Combinatorial Theory Journal Launches on UC’s eScholarship Publishing Platform with Innovative Open Access Funding Model

The eScholarship Publishing program of the University of California is pleased to announce the launch of Combinatorial Theory, a new mathematics journal expecting its first issue in Spring 2021. This journal will publish papers in Combinatorics, an active area of mathematical research with applications throughout the mathematical, computational and natural sciences. Combinatorial Theory is owned by mathematicians who believe in the importance of unfettered access to research as a means of engaging the global combinatorial community. As such, it is an open access publication, with no fees for authors or readers. 

Combinatorial Theory was founded in September 2020, when most of the editorial board for one of the oldest and most prestigious journals in Combinatorics, the Elsevier-owned Journal of Combinatorial Theory, Ser. A (JCTA), announced their intention to resign to start a new, open access journal. The new journal will deepen and broaden the impact of its predecessor, as well as embark on an inclusive vision that is international in scope, with a diverse editorial team seeking top research papers from combinatorial mathematicians worldwide. The journal is committed to fairness and mitigation of implicit biases in its selection processes, including double-blind refereeing, where the identities of authors and referees are not revealed to each other. This makes it a pioneer among mathematics research journals.

Read the rest of the Combinatorial Theory article


EarthArXiv finds a sustainable model for preprint hosting with California Digital Library and Janeway

On October 1, 2020, California Digital Library (CDL) was excited to announce the official re-launch of the EarthArXiv preprint server, now hosted by CDL on the Janeway platform. The site provides access to nearly 1,500 recent preprint publications covering a wide range of topics in Earth Science — and researchers who wish to make their findings immediately and openly available can submit papers now.

“EarthArXiv’s partnership with the CDL expands our capacity to grow sustainable open publishing for the Earth sciences,” said Bruce Caron, one of the founders of EarthArXiv. “CDL and the entire University of California system have demonstrated global leadership for open access to scholarly research. UC campuses house major Earth science research and teaching efforts. EarthArXiv looks forward to a promising future in its new home.”

Read the rest of the EarthArXiv article


UC Davis faculty launch living text for diagnostic imaging in limited resource healthcare settings using Manifold platform and animated GIFs

Faculty at UC Davis Health in collaboration with the California Digital Library (CDL) and Blaisdell Medical Library are pleased to announce the release of Ultrasound in Resource-Limited Settings: A Case Based, Open Access Text. This new online resource aims to provide an open access clinical resource for radiologists and clinicians who practice ultrasound in low and limited resourced healthcare settings. In these regions, most people have no access to diagnostic imaging.  Ultrasound is particularly positioned to help fill this gap as the most portable, inexpensive, and versatile form of diagnostic imaging.

The project is a collaborative effort by health care practitioners worldwide who use point-of-care and comprehensive ultrasound. Each chapter is authored by experts with case-based knowledge of both ultrasound and the highlighted disease. The chapters are 100% case based and provide important insight into how experts practice medicine and apply ultrasound in the limited resourced healthcare setting. As you scroll through chapters, high quality videos (in bandwidth-efficient GIF format) play automatically, and full-resolution video files are available for download and sharing.

Read the rest of the ultrasound article


Massive open course on climate change uses free online text to empower “one million climate warriors”

Scripps Institution of Oceanography climate scientist Veerabhadran Ramanathan has long had the goal of educating and empowering “one million climate warriors” who will help society tackle the world’s greatest existential threat.

A series of new massive open online courses (MOOCs) being offered to the public could provide a substantial leap toward reaching that goal. “Bending the Curve: Climate Change Solutions” is a four-part course series that will be made available to anyone—from high school students to retired professionals—who are interested in solutions to the climate change crisis.

The series is the first course to be offered on a new online platform being launched by UC San Diego. The Bending the Curve MOOC is also supported by an open-access book authored by the lecturers of the course, published by eScholarship and funded by the Gates Foundation.

Read the rest of the Bending the Curve article

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